Sebastian Black
via Retrospective:
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At my local Chase bank A.T.M.s with O.C.R. (Optical Character Recognition) software have aestheticized the once handy deposit slip. I don’t know if the slips are gone, invisible, “infra-thin” or what, but I certainly can’t see them anymore. The desks designed for the retrieval of the slips still mope around though and they release whiffs of symbolic significance as they decompose. If I were Parisian, such scents might engender remembrances or foment nostalgia. Luckily for us I’m a New Yorker - brevity prone - and even the most fetid pile of fish heads turns my mind to real estate.
 - Sebastian Black: ’Towards a Huger Terrace’
    Sebastian Black
via Retrospective:
    Wyatt Niehaus
via DIS Magazine:
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Each of the eight C-prints depicts a different car interior as if from inside dark factories with little to no human workforce. Each piece is only slightly different than the last, the marks of their particular model shown only in their dashboards, a struggle already to discern out of the darkness. At the back of the gallery, a screen directed out toward the street plays a video, “Body Assembly — Central Request,” (2014) filmed at the Rex 2013-International Robot Exhibition in Tokyo and at the FANUC factory in Oshino, Japan, an instructional video with no audience. This video situates each of the prints in both the spaces they were constructed in contrasted with the present, white walled gallery.

Using the factory as his source material, Niehaus situates himself as the spectator within these spaces of production. However, his role is not unlike the (few) other workers in factories such as FANUC that are largely automated. The role of both Niehaus and the worker in this context is that of both a spectator2 and as an instrument of surveillance, policing the robotic arms for errors. Anyone viewing this piece becomes a worker in the factory themselves, involved in the same labor as the workforce in the factory itself, not to mention drawing attention to Niehaus’s hand (or lack thereof) in the work presented here.

However, of course, there’s a darker laborer at work here, that of the programmer designing the tasks undertaken by the machines themselves. Off of the factory floor, a separate workforce constructs the operations used by the overseen machines to build their products. Whether outsourced or part of the same company, these workers act as a third arm, writing in a decentralized, global language of code that does not necessarily require them to be anywhere near the production of these works, but are the dark horse of production. In this way and through creating visualized artifacts of the production line used to create these cars, Niehaus becomes one of the producers closest to the creation of these objects, and, by proxy, we sit closer to these pieces, too.

-       Discerning The Darkness: Wyatt Niehaus’s ‘Light’s Out’
    Wyatt Niehaus
via DIS Magazine:
    Nick Darmstaedter

via Retrospective:
    Nick Darmstaedter
via Retrospective:
    Nick Darmstaedter

via Retrospective:
    Nick Darmstaedter

via Retrospective:
    Nick Darmstaedter

via Retrospective: